Staff member


Núria Camarero Palao

Senior Technician
Nanoprobes and Nanoswitches
ncamarero@ibecbarcelona.eu
+34 934 039 875
Staff member publications

Izquierdo-Serra, M., Bautista-Barrufet, A., Trapero, A., Garrido-Charles, A., Diaz-Tahoces, A., Camarero, N., Pittolo, S., Valbuena, S., Perez-Jimenez, A., Gay, M., Garcia-Moll, A., Rodriguez-Escrich, C., Lerma, J., De La Villa, P., Fernandez, E., Pericas, M. A., Llebaria, A., Gorostiza, P., (2016). Optical control of endogenous receptors and cellular excitability using targeted covalent photoswitches Nature Communications 7, 12221

Light-regulated drugs allow remotely photoswitching biological activity and enable plausible therapies based on small molecules. However, only freely diffusible photochromic ligands have been shown to work directly in endogenous receptors and methods for covalent attachment depend on genetic manipulation. Here we introduce a chemical strategy to covalently conjugate and photoswitch the activity of endogenous proteins and demonstrate its application to the kainate receptor channel GluK1. The approach is based on photoswitchable ligands containing a short-lived, highly reactive anchoring group that is targeted at the protein of interest by ligand affinity. These targeted covalent photoswitches (TCPs) constitute a new class of light-regulated drugs and act as prosthetic molecules that photocontrol the activity of GluK1-expressing neurons, and restore photoresponses in degenerated retina. The modularity of TCPs enables the application to different ligands and opens the way to new therapeutic opportunities.


Nevola, L., Martín-Quirós, A., Eckelt, K., Camarero, N., Tosi, S., Llobet, A., Giralt, E., Gorostiza, P., (2013). Light-regulated stapled peptides to inhibit protein-protein interactions involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis Angewandte Chemie - International Edition 52, (30), 7704-7708

Control of membrane traffic: Photoswitchable inhibitors of protein-protein interactions were applied to photoregulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in living cells. Traffic light (TL) peptides acting as "stop" and "go" signals for membrane traffic can be used to dissect the role of CME in receptor internalization and in cell growth, division, and differentiation.

Keywords: Clathrin-mediated endocytosis, Optopharmacology, Peptides, Photoswitches, Protein-protein interactions


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