Staff member


Javier Burgués Calderón

PhD Student
Signal and Information Processing for Sensing Systems
jburgues@ibecbarcelona.eu
+34 934 029 070
Staff member publications

Pomareda, V., Magrans, R., Jiménez-Soto, J., Martínez, D., Tresánchez, M., Burgués, J., Palacín, J., Marco, S., (2017). Chemical source localization fusing concentration information in the presence of chemical background noise Sensors 17, (4), 904

We present the estimation of a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume dispersed under atmospheric turbulence under uniform wind conditions. The main contribution of this work is to extend previous proposals based on Bayesian inference with binary detections to the use of concentration information while at the same time being robust against the presence of background chemical noise. For that, the algorithm builds a background model with robust statistics measurements to assess the posterior probability that a given chemical concentration reading comes from the background or from a source emitting at a distance with a specific release rate. In addition, our algorithm allows multiple mobile gas sensors to be used. Ten realistic simulations and ten real data experiments are used for evaluation purposes. For the simulations, we have supposed that sensors are mounted on cars which do not have among its main tasks navigating toward the source. To collect the real dataset, a special arena with induced wind is built, and an autonomous vehicle equipped with several sensors, including a photo ionization detector (PID) for sensing chemical concentration, is used. Simulation results show that our algorithm, provides a better estimation of the source location even for a low background level that benefits the performance of binary version. The improvement is clear for the synthetic data while for real data the estimation is only slightly better, probably because our exploration arena is not able to provide uniform wind conditions. Finally, an estimation of the computational cost of the algorithmic proposal is presented.

Keywords: Machine olfaction, Odor robots, Chemical sensors, Bayesian inference


The objective of this work is to apply Atomic Force Microscopy in Peak Force mode to obtain topographic characteristics (mean roughness, root-mean-square roughness, skewness and kurtosis) and mechanical characteristics (adhesion, elastic modulus) of Siloxane-Hydrogel Soft Contact Lenses (CLs) of two different materials, Lotrafilcon B of Air Optix (AO) and Asmofilcon A of PremiO (P), after use (worn CLs). Thus, the results obtained with both materials will be compared, as well as the changes produced by the wear at a nanoscopic level. The results show significant changes in the topographic and mechanical characteristics of the CLs, at a nanoscopic level, due to wear. The AO CL show values of the topographic parameters lower than those of the P CL after wear, which correlates with a better comfort qualification given to the former by the wearers. A significant correlation has also been obtained between the adhesion values found after the use of the CLs with tear quality tests, both break-up-time and Schirmer.

Keywords: Adhesion, Atomic force microscopy-peak force mode, Surface topography, Worn siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses, Young modulus


The photosynthesis is the process used by plants and bacteria cells to convert inorganic matter in organic thanks to the light energy. This process consist on several steps, being one of them the electronic transport from the photosystem II to the cytochrome thanks to plastoquinone-9 (PQ). Here we prepare membranes that mimic the characteristics and composition of natural photosynthetic cell membranes and we characterize them in order to obtain the PQ molecules position in the membrane and their electrochemical behaviour. The selected galactolipid is digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) that represents the 30% of the thylakoid membrane lipid content. The results obtained are worthful for several science fields due to the relevance of galactolipids as anti-algal, anti-viral, anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory agents and the antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties of prenylquinones. Both pure components (DGDG and PQ) and the DGDG:PQ mixtures have been studied using surface pressure-area isotherms. These isotherms give information about the film stability and indicate the thermodynamic behaviour of the mixture and their physical state. The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film has been transferred forming a monolayer that mimics the bottom layer of the biological membranes. This monolayer on mica has been topographically characterized using AFM and both the height and the physical state that they present have been obtained. Moreover, these monolayers have been transferred onto ITO that is a hydrophilic substrate with good optical and electrical features, so that, it is suitable for studying the electrochemical behaviour of these systems and it is a good candidate for energy producing devices.

Keywords: Biomimetic membrane, Digalactosyldiacylglycerol, Electron transfer, LangmuirBlodgett film, Modified ITO electrode, Plastoquinone


The electrochemical behaviour of biomimetic monolayers of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) incorporating ubiquinone-10 (UQ) has been investigated. MGDG is the principal component in the thylakoid membrane and UQ seems a good substitute for plastoquinone-9, involved in photosynthesis chain. The monolayers have been performed using the Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) techniques and the redox behaviour of the LB films, transferred at several surface pressures on a glass covered with indium-tin oxide (ITO), has been characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The cyclic voltammograms show that UQ molecules present two redox processes (I and II) at high UQ content and high surface pressures, and only one redox process (I) at low UQ content and low surface pressures. The apparent rate constants calculated for processes I and II indicate a different kinetic control for the reduction and the oxidation of UQ/UQH2 redox couple, being kRapp(I)=2.2·10-5s-1, kRapp(II)=5.1·10-14 kOapp(I)=3.3·10-3s-1 and kOapp(II)=6.1·10-6s-1, respectively. The correlation of the redox response with the physical states of the LB films allows determining the positions of the UQ molecules in the biomimetic monolayer, which change with the surface pressure and the UQ content. These positions are known as diving and swimming.

Keywords: Cyclic voltammetry, Electron transfer, Langmuir-Blodgett film, Modified ITO electrode, Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, Ubiquinone


Photosynthetic organisms use light to convert the inorganic matter in organic one. Photosynthetic process consists on several steps, and one of them involves plastoquinone (PQ) that acts as electron and proton shuttle between photosystem II and cytochrome. We prepared membranes that mimic the characteristics and composition of natural photosynthetic membranes and we characterized them using several techniques in order to obtain both the PQ molecules disposition in the membrane and their electrochemical behavior. The selected lipid was monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) that represents the 50% of the lipid content of the thylakoid membrane. Both MGDG and PQ, and the MGDG:PQ mixtures have been studied using surface pressure-area isotherms and the presence of PQ alters the physical state and compactness of the MGDG matrix. Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films have been obtained by transferring a monolayer that mimics half of the bilayer of a biological membrane. The AFM topographical characterization of the monolayers on mica indicates the presence of differentiated domains, corresponding to different physical states linked to the influence of the PQ content. Moreover, the electrochemical behavior of the monolayers has been studied when transferred on ITO, observing one main electrochemical process that is due to the diving position of PQ molecules in the lipid matrix.


In this work we report the fabrication of Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of a substituted ZnPc (octakis(oxyoctyl)phthalocyanine of zinc), and their characterization by means of several techniques. These characterization techniques include surface pressure (π-A) and surface potential (ΔV-A) isotherms as well as UV-vis Reflection spectroscopy and Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM) for the films at the air-water interface together with UV-vis absorption and IR spectroscopies and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for the LB films. The π-A and ΔV-A isotherms and BAM images indicate a phase transition at a surface pressure of ca. 9 mN/m and a multilayer formation at surface pressures around 19-20 mN/m; at a surface pressure around 27 mN/m a disordered collapse of the film occurs. In addition, AFM images of LB films at π = 10 mN/m and π = 20 mN/m show a monomolecular and a multilayered film, respectively. The comparison of the UV-vis spectrum of ZnPc in solution, the reflection spectra of the Langmuir films and UV-vis spectra of LB films reveals a significant reduction in the Q band intensity for the films, indicative of an organization of ZnPc in the Langmuir and LB films versus the random distribution in solution. The UV-vis Reflection spectra are also consistent with multilayer formation at surface pressures around 19-20 mN/m. The relative intensities of the IR spectrum bands change from the KBr pellet to the LB film which is also attributable to orientation effects in the film. Cyclic voltammetric experiments of LB films incorporating the ZnPc derivative show peaks that can be correlated with redox processes occurring in the phthalocyanine ring. A small but significant influence of the surface pressure and the number of deposited layers in the electrochemical behaviour is observed. The electrochemical response of cast films exhibits some differences with respect to that of LB films which have been attributed to their different molecular organizations.

Keywords: Atomic Force Microscopy, Electrochemistry, Langmuir-Blodgett, Multilayers, Optical spectroscopy techniques, Zinc phthalocyanine, Atomic force microscopy, Electrochemistry, Interfaces (materials), Isotherms, Multilayers, Nitrogen compounds, Optical multilayers, Organic polymers, Zinc compounds, Brewster angle microscopy, Characterization techniques, Electrochemical behaviour, Langmuir and langmuir-blodgett films, Langmuir-blodgett, Optical spectroscopy techniques, UV-Vis Reflection Spectroscopy, Zinc phthalocyanines, Langmuir Blodgett films


Ubiquinone (UQ) is one of the main electron and proton shuttle molecules in biological systems, and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is one of the most used model lipids. Supported planar bilayers (SPBs) are extensively accepted as biological model membranes. In this study, SPBs have been deposited on ITO, which is a semiconductor with good electrical and optical features. Specifically, topographic atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and force curves have been performed on SPBs with several DPPC:UQ ratios to study the location and the interaction of UQ in the SPB. Additionally, cyclic voltammetry has been used to understand the electrochemical behavior of DPPC:UQ SPBs. Obtained results show that, in our case, UQ is placed in two main different positions in SPBs. First, between the DPPC hydrophobic chains, fact that originates a decrease in the breakthrough force of the bilayer, and the second between the two leaflets that form the SPBs. This second position occurs when increasing the UQ content, fact that eventually forms UQ aggregates at high concentrations. The formation of aggregates produces an expansion of the SPB average height and a bimodal distribution of the breakthrough force. The voltammetric response of UQ depends on its position on the bilayer.

Keywords: Bimodal distribution, Biological models, Dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, Electrochemical behaviors, Hydrophobic chains, Supported lipid bilayers, Supported planar bilayers, Voltammetric response


Ubiquinone and plastoquinone are two of the main electron and proton shuttle molecules in biological systems, and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) is the most abundant lipid in the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts. Saturated MGDG, ubiquinone-10 (UQ) and MGDG:UQ mixed monolayers at the air/water interface have been studied using surface pressure-area isotherms and Brewster Angle Microscopy. Moreover, the transferred Langmuir-Blodgett films have been observed by Atomic Force Microscopy. The results show that MGDG:UQ mixtures present more fluid phase than pure MGDG, indicating a higher order degree for the later. It is also observed an important influence of UQ on the MGDG matrix before UQ collapse pressure and a low influence after this event, due to UQ expulsion from the MGDG matrix. This expulsion leads to a similar remaining UQ content for all the tested mixtures, indicating a limiting content of this molecule in the MGDG matrix at high surface pressures. The thermodynamic studies confirm the stability of the MGDG:UQ mixtures at low surface pressures, although presenting a non-ideal behaviour. Results point to consider UQ as a good candidate for studies of artificial photosynthesis.

Keywords: AFM, BAM, Biomimetic films, Langmuir-Blodgett film, Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, Ubiquinone


The structure and the electrochemical behaviour of Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of the biological ubiquinone-10 (UQ) and a mixture of dipalmytoilphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and UQ at the molar ratios DPPC:UQ 5:1 and 10:1 have been investigated. The surface pressure-area isotherms of the Langmuir films and the AFM images of the LB films show the formation of a monolayer in the DPPC:UQ mixture till a certain surface pressure is attained, and then at higher surface pressures the UQ is progressively expelled. The cyclic voltammograms of DPPC:UQ LB films formed on indium tin oxide, ITO, at different surface pressures show one reduction and one oxidation peak at low surface pressures, but two or even more reduction and oxidations peaks at medium and high surface pressures. The electrochemical behaviour is correlated with the film structure.

Keywords: Cyclic voltammetry, Electron transfer, Langmuir-Blodgett, Lipid monolayer, Modified ITO electrode, Ubiquinone


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