Publications

by Keyword: PAINT


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Delcanale, P., Porciani, D., Pujals, S., Jurkevich, A., Chetrusca, A., Tawiah, K. D., Burke, D. H., Albertazzi, L., (2020). Aptamers with tunable affinity enable single-molecule tracking and localization of membrane receptors on living cancer cells Angewandte Chemie - International Edition 59, (42), 18546-18555

Tumor cell-surface markers are usually overexpressed or mutated protein receptors for which spatiotemporal regulation differs between and within cancers. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging can profile individual markers in different cellular contexts with molecular precision. However, standard single-molecule imaging methods based on overexpressed genetically encoded tags or cumbersome probes can significantly alter the native state of receptors. We introduce a live-cell points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography (PAINT) method that exploits aptamers as minimally invasive affinity probes. Localization and tracking of individual receptors are based on stochastic and transient binding between aptamers and their targets. We demonstrated single-molecule imaging of a model tumor marker (EGFR) on a panel of living cancer cells. Affinity to EGFR was finely tuned by rational engineering of aptamer sequences to define receptor motion and/or native receptor density.

Keywords: Aptamers, Cell-surface receptors, Live-cell imaging, PAINT, Single-molecule tracking


Delcanale, P., Albertazzi, L., (2020). DNA-PAINT super-resolution imaging data of surface exposed active sites on particles Data in Brief 30, 105468

Surface functionalization with targeting ligands confers to nanomaterials the ability of selectively recognize a biological target. Therefore, a quantitative characterization of surface functional molecules is critical for the rational development of nanomaterials-based applications, especially in nanomedicine research. Single-molecule localization microscopy can provide visualization of surface molecules at the level of individual particles, preserving the integrity of the material and overcoming the limitations of analytical methods based on ensemble averaging. Here we provide single-molecule localization data obtained on streptavidin-coated polystyrene particles, which can be exploited as a model system for surface-functionalized materials. After loading of the active sites of streptavidin molecules with a biotin-conjugated probe, they were imaged with a DNA-PAINT imaging approach, which can provide single-molecule imaging at subdiffraction resolution and molecule counting. Both raw records and analysed data, consisting in a list of space-time single-molecule coordinates, are shared. Additionally, Matlab functions are provided that analyse the single-molecule coordinates in order to quantify features of individual particles. These data might constitute a valuable reference for applications of similar quantitative imaging methodologies to other types of functionalized nanomaterials.

Keywords: DNA-PAINT, Functional materials, Nanoparticles, Single-molecule localization microscopy, Super-resolution microscopy


Fuentes, E., Bohá, Fuentes-Caparrós, A. M., Schweins, R., Draper, E. R., Adams, D. J., Pujals, S., Albertazzi, L., (2020). PAINT-ing fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-diphenylalanine hydrogels Chemistry - A European Journal 26, (44), 9869-9873

Self-assembly of fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-protected diphenylalanine (FmocFF) in water is widely known to produce hydrogels. Typically, confocal microscopy is used to visualize such hydrogels under wet conditions, that is, without freezing or drying. However, key aspects of hydrogels like fiber diameter, network morphology and mesh size are sub-diffraction limited features and cannot be visualized effectively using this approach. In this work, we show that it is possible to image FmocFF hydrogels by Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (PAINT) in native conditions and without direct gel labelling. We demonstrate that the fiber network can be visualized with improved resolution (≈50 nm) both in 2D and 3D. Quantitative information is extracted such as mesh size and fiber diameter. This method can complement the existing characterization tools for hydrogels and provide useful information supporting the design of new materials.

Keywords: FmocFF, Hydrogels, Mesh size, PAINT, Super-resolution