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by Keyword: Hyperpolarization

Eills, J, Azagra, M, Gómez-Cabeza, D, Tayler, MCD, Marco-Rius, I, (2024). Polarization losses from the nonadiabatic passage of hyperpolarized solutions through metallic components Journal Of Magnetic Resonance Open 18, 100144

From complex -mixture analysis to in vivo molecular imaging, applications of liquid -state nuclear spin hyperpolarization have expanded widely over recent years. In most cases, hyperpolarized solutions are generated and transported from the polarization instrument to the measurement device. The sample hyperpolarization usually survives this transport, since the changes in magnetic fields that are external to the sample are typically adiabatic (slow) with respect to the internal nuclear spin dynamics. The passage of polarized samples through weakly magnetic components such as stainless steel syringe needles and ferrules is not always adiabatic, can lead to near -complete destruction of the magnetization. To avoid this effect becoming "folklore"in field of hyperpolarized NMR, we present a systematic investigation to highlight the problem and investigate possible solutions. Experiments were carried out on: (i) dissolution-DNP-polarized [1-13C]pyruvate with detection at 1.4 T, and (ii) 1.5 -T -polarized H2O with NMR detection at 2.5 mu T. We show that the degree adiabaticity of solutions passing through metal parts is intrinsically unpredictable, likely depending on factors such as solution flow rate, degree of remanent ferromagnetism in the metal, and nuclear spin However, the magnetization destruction effects can be suppressed by application of an external field order of 0.1-10 mT.

JTD Keywords: Benchtop nmr, Hyperpolarization, Hyperpolarization,non-adiabatic,low-field mri,spin relaxation,benchtop nm, Low-field mri, Non-adiabatic, Spin relaxation


Barskiy, DA, Blanchard, JW, Budker, D, Stern, Q, Eills, J, Elliott, SJ, Picazo-Frutos, R, Garcon, A, Jannin, S, Koptyug, IV, (2023). Possible Applications of Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Conjunction with Zero- to Ultralow-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Applied Magnetic Resonance 54, 1221-1240

The combination of a powerful and broadly applicable nuclear hyperpolarization technique with emerging (near-)zero-field modalities offers novel opportunities in a broad range of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging applications, including biomedical diagnostics, monitoring catalytic reactions within metal reactors and many others. These are discussed along with a roadmap for future developments.

JTD Keywords: Couplings, Hyperpolarization, Nmr, Parahydrogen, Phase, Radicals, Time


Chuchkova, L, Bodenstedt, S, Picazo-Frutos, R, Eills, J, Tretiak, O, Hu, YA, Barskiy, DA, de Santis, J, Tayler, MCD, Budker, D, Sheberstov, KF, (2023). Magnetometer-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Photochemically Hyperpolarized Molecules Journal Of Physical Chemistry Letters 14, 6814-6822

Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) enables nuclear spin ordering by irradiating samples with light. Polarized spins are conventionally detected via high-field chemical-shift-resolved NMR (above 0.1 T). In this Letter, we demonstrate in situ low-field photo-CIDNP measurements using a magnetically shielded fast-field-cycling NMR setup detecting Larmor precession via atomic magnetometers. For solutions comprising mM concentrations of the photochemically polarized molecules, hyperpolarized 1H magnetization is detected by pulse-acquired NMR spectroscopy. The observed NMR line widths are about 5 times narrower than normally anticipated in high-field NMR and are systematically affected by light irradiation during the acquisition period, reflecting a reduction of the transverse relaxation time constant, T2*, on the order of 10%. Magnetometer-detected photo-CIDNP spectroscopy enables straightforward observation of spin-chemistry processes in the ambient field range from a few nT to tens of mT. Potential applications of this measuring modality are discussed.

JTD Keywords: field-dependence, mechanism, nmr, parahydrogen, photo-cidnp, polarization, quinone, spin-hyperpolarization, Radical-pair


Santos-Pata, Diogo, Zucca, Riccardo, López-Carral, Héctor, Verschure, P., (2019). Modulating grid cell scale and intrinsic frequencies via slow high-threshold conductances: A simplified model Neural Networks 119, 66-73

Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) have known spatial periodic firing fields which provide a metric for the representation of self-location and path planning. The hexagonal tessellation pattern of grid cells scales up progressively along the MEC’s layer II dorsal-to-ventral axis. This scaling gradient has been hypothesized to originate either from inter-population synaptic dynamics as postulated by attractor networks, or from projected theta frequency waves to different axis levels, as in oscillatory models. Alternatively, cellular dynamics and specifically slow high-threshold conductances have been proposed to have an impact on the grid cell scale. To test the hypothesis that intrinsic hyperpolarization-activated cation currents account for both the scaled gradient and the oscillatory frequencies observed along the dorsal-to-ventral axis, we have modeled and analyzed data from a population of grid cells simulated with spiking neurons interacting through low-dimensional attractor dynamics. We observed that the intrinsic neuronal membrane properties of simulated cells were sufficient to induce an increase in grid scale and potentiate differences in the membrane potential oscillatory frequency. Overall, our results suggest that the after-spike dynamics of cation currents may play a major role in determining the grid cells’ scale and that oscillatory frequencies are a consequence of intrinsic cellular properties that are specific to different levels of the dorsal-to-ventral axis in the MEC layer II.

JTD Keywords: Grid cells, Entorhinal, Hyperpolarization, Navigation, Space