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by Keyword: tumor heterogeneity

Woythe L, Tito NB, Albertazzi L, (2021). A quantitative view on multivalent nanomedicine targeting Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews 169, 1-21

© 2020 The Authors Although the concept of selective delivery has been postulated over 100 years ago, no targeted nanomedicine has been clinically approved so far. Nanoparticles modified with targeting ligands to promote the selective delivery of therapeutics towards a specific cell population have been extensively reported. However, the rational design of selective particles is still challenging. One of the main reasons for this is the lack of quantitative theoretical and experimental understanding of the interactions involved in cell targeting. In this review, we discuss new theoretical models and experimental methods that provide a quantitative view of targeting. We show the new advancements in multivalency theory enabling the rational design of super-selective nanoparticles. Furthermore, we present the innovative approaches to obtain key targeting parameters at the single-cell and single molecule level and their role in the design of targeting nanoparticles. We believe that the combination of new theoretical multivalent design and experimental methods to quantify receptors and ligands aids in the rational design and clinical translation of targeted nanomedicines.

JTD Keywords: binding-kinetics, biological identity, biomolecular corona, blood-brain-barrier, drug-delivery, gold nanoparticles, multivalency, nanotechnology, protein corona, quantitative characterization, rational design, super-selectivity, superresolution microscopy, tumor heterogeneity, Ligand-receptor interactions, Multivalency, Nanotechnology, Quantitative characterization, Rational design, Super-selectivity


Mas, S., Torro, A., Fernández, L., Bec, N., Gongora, C., Larroque, C., Martineau, P., de Juan, A., Marco, S., (2020). MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and chemometric tools to discriminate highly similar colorectal cancer tissues Talanta 208, 120455

Intratumour heterogeneity due to cancer cell clonal evolution and microenvironment composition and tumor differences due to genetic variations between patients suffering of the same cancer pathology play a crucial role in patient response to therapies. This study is oriented to show that matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-Mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI), combined with an advanced multivariate data processing pipeline can be used to discriminate subtle variations between highly similar colorectal tumors. To this aim, experimental tumors reproducing the emergence of drug-resistant clones were generated in athymic mice using subcutaneous injection of different mixes of two isogenic cell lines, the irinotecan-resistant HCT116-SN50 (R) and its sibling human colon adenocarcinoma sensitive cell line HCT116 (S). Because irinotecan-resistant and irinotecan-sensitive are derived from the same original parental HCT116 cell line, their genetic characteristics and molecular compositions are closely related. The multivariate data processing pipeline proposed relies on three steps: (a) multiset multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to separate biological contributions from background; (b) multiset K-means segmentation using MCR scores of the biological contributions to separate between tumor and necrotic parts of the tissues; and (c) partial-least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) applied to tumor pixel spectra to discriminate between R and S tumor populations. High levels of correct classification rates (0.85), sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.77) for the PLS-DA classification model were obtained. If previously labelled tissue is available, the multistep modeling strategy proposed constitutes a good approach for the identification and characterization of highly similar phenotypic tumor subpopulations that could be potentially applicable to any kind of cancer tissue that exhibits substantial heterogeneity. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.

JTD Keywords: Chemometrics, Colorectal cancer, MALDI imaging, Multivariate analysis, Tumor heterogeneity