Publications

by Keyword: Thermoresponsive


By year:[ 2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 ]

Maiti, B., Abramov, A., Franco, L., Puiggalí, J., Enshaei, H., Alemán, C., Díaz, D. D., (2020). Thermoresponsive shape-memory hydrogel actuators made by phototriggered click chemistry Advanced Functional Materials 30, (24), 2001683

This article describes the design and synthesis of a new series of hydrogel membranes composed of trialkyne derivatives of glycerol ethoxylate and bisphenol A diazide (BA-diazide) or diazide-terminated PEG600 monomer via a Cu(I)-catalyzed photoclick reaction. The water-swollen hydrogel membranes display thermoresponsive actuation and their lower critical solution temperature (LCST) values are determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Glycerol ethoxylate moiety serves as the thermoresponsive component and hydrophilic part, while the azide-based component acts as the hydrophobic comonomer and most likely provides a critical hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance contributing also to the significant mechanical strength of the membranes. These hydrogels exhibit a reversible shape-memory effect in response to temperature through a defined phase transition. The swelling and deswelling behavior of the membranes are systematically examined. Due to the click nature of the reaction, easy availability of azide and alkyne functional-monomers, and the polymer architecture, the glass transition temperature (Tg) is easily controlled through monomer design and crosslink density by varying the feed ratio of different monomers. The mechanical properties of the membranes are studied by universal tensile testing measurements. Moreover, the hydrogels show the ability to absorb a dye and release it in a controlled manner by applying heat below and above the LCST.

Keywords: Hydrogels, Membranes, Photoclick, Polymers, Shape-memory, Thermoresponsive


Vidal, E., Torres, D., Guillem-Marti, J., Scionti, G., Manero, J. M., Ginebra, M. P., Rodríguez, D., Rupérez, E., (2020). Titanium scaffolds by direct ink writing: Fabrication and functionalization to guide osteoblast behavior Metals 10, (9), 1156

Titanium (Ti) and Ti alloys have been used for decades for bone prostheses due to its mechanical reliability and good biocompatibility. However, the high stiffness of Ti implants and the lack of bioactivity are pending issues that should be improved to minimize implant failure. The stress shielding effect, a result of the stiffness mismatch between titanium and bone, can be reduced by introducing a tailored structural porosity in the implant. In this work, porous titanium structures were produced by direct ink writing (DIW), using a new Ti ink formulation containing a thermosensitive hydrogel. A thermal treatment was optimized to ensure the complete elimination of the binder before the sintering process, in order to avoid contamination of the titanium structures. The samples were sintered in argon atmosphere at 1200 °C, 1300 °C or 1400 °C, resulting in total porosities ranging between 72.3% and 77.7%. A correlation was found between the total porosity and the elastic modulus of the scaffolds. The stiffness and yield strength were similar to those of cancellous bone. The functionalization of the scaffold surface with a cell adhesion fibronectin recombinant fragment resulted in enhanced adhesion and spreading of osteoblastic-like cells, together with increased alkaline phosphatase expression and mineralization.

Keywords: Direct ink writing, Osseointegration, Recombinant protein, Thermoresponsive binder, Titanium, Titanium scaffold


Maazouz, Y., Montufar, E. B., Malbert, J., Espanol, M., Ginebra, M. P., (2017). Self-hardening and thermoresponsive alpha tricalcium phosphate/pluronic pastes Acta Biomaterialia 49, 563-574

Although calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are used for bone regeneration in a wide range of clinical applications, various physicochemical phenomena are known to hinder their potential use in minimally invasive surgery or in highly vascularized surgical sites, mainly because of their lack of injectability or their low washout resistance. The present work shows that the combination of CPCs with an inverse-thermoresponsive hydrogel is a good strategy for finely tuning the cohesive and rheological properties of CPCs to achieve clinical acceptable injectability to prevent phase separation during implantation and cohesion to avoid washout of the paste. The thermoresponsive CPC developed combines alpha-tricalcium phosphate with an aqueous solution of pluronic F127, which exhibits an inverse thermoresponsive behaviour, with a gelling transformation at around body temperature. These novel CPCs exhibited temperature-dependent properties. Addition of the polymer enhanced the injectability of the paste, even at a low liquid-to-powder ratio, and allowed the rheological properties of the cement to be tuned, with the injection force decreasing with the temperature of the paste. Moreover, the cohesion of the paste was also temperature-dependent and increased as the temperature of the host medium increased due to gelling induced in the paste. The thermoresponsive cement exhibited excellent cohesion and clinically acceptable setting times at 37 °C, irrespective of the initial temperature of the paste. The addition of pluronic F127 slightly delayed the setting reaction in the early stages but did not hinder the full transformation to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite. Moreover, the frozen storage of premixed thermoresponsive cement pastes was explored, the main physicochemical properties of the cements being maintained upon thawing, even after 18 months of frozen storage. This avoids the need to mix the cement in the operating theatre and allows its use off-the-shelf. The reverse thermoresponsive cements studied herein open up new perspectives in the surgical field, where the sequential gelling/hardening of these novel cements could allow for a better and safer clinical application. Statement of Significance: Calcium phosphate cements are attractive bone substitutes due to their similarity to the bone mineral phase. Although they can be injectable, cohesion and stability of the paste are crucial in terms of performance and safety. A common strategy is the combination with hydrogels. However, this often results in a decrease of viscosity with increasing temperature, which can lead to extravasation and particle leakage from the bone defect. The preferred evolution would be the opposite: a low viscosity would enhance mixing and injection, and an instantaneous increase of viscosity after injection would ensure washout resistance to the blood flow. Here we develop for the first time a calcium phosphate cement exhibiting reverse thermoresponsive properties using a poloxamer featuring inverse thermal gelling.

Keywords: Calcium phosphate cement, Cohesion, Hydroxyapatite, Injectability, Pluronic, Thermoresponsive