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by Keyword: beta-cell


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Clua-Ferré, Laura, Chiara, Francesco, Rodríguez-Comas, Júlia, Comelles, Jordi, Martinez, Elena, Godeau, Amelie Luise, García-Alamán, Ainhoa, Gasa, Rosa, Ramón-Azcón, Javier, (2022). Collagen-Tannic Acid Spheroids for beta-Cell Encapsulation Fabricated Using a 3D Bioprinter Advanced Materials Technologies , 2101696

Velasco-Mallorqui, F, Rodriguez-Comas, J, Ramon-Azcon, J, (2021). Cellulose-based scaffolds enhance pseudoislets formation and functionality Biofabrication 13,

In vitro research for the study of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is frequently limited by the availability of a functional model for islets of Langerhans. To overcome the limitations of obtaining pancreatic islets from different sources, such as animal models or human donors, immortalized cell lines as the insulin-producing INS1E beta-cells have appeared as a valid alternative to model insulin-related diseases. However, immortalized cell lines are mainly used in flat surfaces or monolayer distributions, not resembling the spheroid-like architecture of the pancreatic islets. To generate islet-like structures, the use of scaffolds appeared as a valid tool to promote cell aggregations. Traditionally-used hydrogel encapsulation methods do not accomplish all the requisites for pancreatic tissue engineering, as its poor nutrient and oxygen diffusion induces cell death. Here, we use cryogelation technology to develop a more resemblance scaffold with the mechanical and physical properties needed to engineer pancreatic tissue. This study shows that carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) cryogels prompted cells to generate beta-cell clusters in comparison to gelatin-based scaffolds, that did not induce this cell organization. Moreover, the high porosity achieved with CMC cryogels allowed us to create specific range pseudoislets. Pseudoislets formed within CMC-scaffolds showed cell viability for up to 7 d and a better response to glucose over conventional monolayer cultures. Overall, our results demonstrate that CMC-scaffolds can be used to control the organization and function of insulin-producing beta-cells, representing a suitable technique to generate beta-cell clusters to study pancreatic islet function.

Keywords: biomaterial, cryogel, pancreatic islets, scaffold, tissue engineering, ?-cell, Architecture, Beta-cell, Beta-cell heterogeneity, Biomaterial, Carboxymethyl cellulose, Cell culture, Cell death, Cell engineering, Cell organization, Cells, Cellulose, Cryogel, Cryogels, Cytoarchitecture, Delivery, Encapsulation methods, Gelation, Gene-expression, Immortalized cells, Insulin, Insulin secretory responses, Islets of langerhans, Mechanical and physical properties, Monolayer culture, Monolayers, Pancreatic islets, Pancreatic tissue, Pancreatic-islets, Proliferation, Scaffold, Scaffolds, Scaffolds (biology), Size, Tissue, Tissue engineering


Perán, M., Sánchez-Ferrero, A., Tosh, D., Marchal, J. A., Lopez, E., Alvarez, P., Boulaiz, H., Rodríguez-Serrano, F., Aranega, A., (2011). Ultrastructural and molecular analyzes of insulin-producing cells induced from human hepatoma cells Cytotherapy , 13, (2), 193-200

Background aims. Diabetes type I is an autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing (beta-) cells and resulting in external insulin dependence for life. Islet transplantation represents a potential treatment for diabetes but there is currently a shortage of suitable organs donors. To augment the supply of donors, different strategies are required to provide a potential source of beta-cells. These sources include embryonic and adult stem cells as well as differentiated cell types. The main goal of this study was to induce the transdifferentiation (or conversion of one type cell to another) of human hepatoma cells (HepG2 cells) to insulin-expressing cells based on the exposure of HepG2 cells to an extract of rat insulinoma cells (RIN). Methods. HepG2 cells were first transiently permeabilized with Streptolysin O and then exposed to a cell extract obtained from RIN cells. Following transient exposure to the RIN extract, the HepG2 cells were cultured for 3 weeks. Results. Acquisition of the insulin-producing cell phenotype was determined on the basis of (i) morphologic and (ii) ultrastructural observations, (iii) immunologic detection and (iv) reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Conclusions. This study supports the use of cell extract as a feasible method for achieve transdifferentiation of hepatic cells to insulin-producing cells.

Keywords: Beta-cells, Diabetes, Insulin-producing cells, Transdifferentiation