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by Keyword: bioavailability

Fulgheri F, Manca ML, Fernàndez-Busquets X, Manconi M, (2023). Analysis of complementarities between nanomedicine and phytodrugs for the treatment of malarial infection Nanomedicine 18, 1681-1696

The use of nanocarriers in medicine, so-called nanomedicine, is one of the most innovative strategies for targeting drugs at the action site and increasing their activity index and effectiveness. Phytomedicine is the oldest traditional method used to treat human diseases and solve health problems. The recent literature on the treatment of malaria infections using nanodelivery systems and phytodrugs or supplements has been analyzed. For the first time, in the present review, a careful look at the considerable potential of nanomedicine in promoting phytotherapeutic efficacy was done, and its key role in addressing a translation through a significant reduction of the current burden of malaria in many parts of the world has been underlined.

JTD Keywords: antiplasmodial activity, bioavailability, chloroquine, combination therapy, discovery, drug-delivery, drug-delivery systems, nanocapsules, nanomedicine, natural molecules, pharmacokinetics, phytomedicine, plasmodium-falciparum, Artemisinin-based combination therapy, Drug-delivery systems, Nanomedicine, Natural molecules, Phytomedicine, Solid lipid nanoparticles


Valenti, S, Arioli, M, Jamett, A, Tamarit, JL, Puiggalí, J, Macovez, R, (2023). Amorphous solid dispersions of curcumin in a poly(ester amide): Antiplasticizing effect on the glass transition and macromolecular relaxation dynamics, and controlled release International Journal Of Pharmaceutics 644, 123333

In order to exploit the pharmacological potential of natural bioactive molecules with low water solubility, such as curcumin, it is necessary to develop formulations, such as amorphous polymer dispersions, which allow a constant release rate and at the same time avoid possible toxicity effects of the crystalline form of the molecule under scrutiny. In this study, polymer dispersions of curcumin were obtained in PADAS, a biodegradable semicrystalline copolymer based on 1,12-dodecanediol, sebacic acid and alanine. The dispersions were fully characterized by means of differential scanning calorimetry and broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and the drug release profile was measured in a simulated body fluid. Amorphous homogeneous binary dispersions were obtained for curcumin mass fraction between 30 and 50%. Curcumin has significantly higher glass transition temperature Tg (≈ 347 K) than the polymer matrix (≈274-277 K depending on the molecular weight), and dispersions displayed Tg's intermediate between those of the pure amorphous components, implying that curcumin acts as an effective antiplasticizer for PADAS. Dielectric spectroscopy was employed to assess the relaxation dynamics of the binary dispersion with 30 wt% curcumin, as well as that of each (amorphous) component separately. The binary dispersion was characterized by a single structural relaxation, a single Johari-Goldstein process, and two local intramolecular processes, one for each component. Interestingly, the latter processes scaled with the Tg of the sample, indicating that they are viscosity-sensitive. In addition, both the pristine polymer and the dispersion exhibited an interfacial Maxwell-Wagner relaxation, likely due to spatial heterogeneities associated with phase disproportionation in this polymer. The release of curcumin from the dispersion in a simulated body fluid followed a Fickian diffusion profile, and 51% of the initial curcumin content was released in 48 h.Copyright © 2023. Published by Elsevier B.V.

JTD Keywords: antioxidant, bioavailability, dielectric spectroscopy, domain havriliak-negami, glass transition temperature, kinetic stability, molecular mobility, nm pores, phase-behavior, physical stability, release kinetics, temperature, thermodynamic quantities, time, Amorphous formulations, Dielectric spectroscopy, Glass transition temperature, Kinetic stability, Kohlrausch-williams-watts, Molecular mobility, Release kinetics