DONATE

Publications

by Keyword: Caco-2 cells

Perra, M, Manca, ML, Tuberoso, CIG, Caddeo, C, Marongiu, F, Peris, JE, Orru, G, Ibba, A, Fernandez-Busquets, X, Fattouch, S, Bacchetta, G, Manconi, M, (2022). A green and cost-effective approach for the efficient conversion of grape byproducts into innovative delivery systems tailored to ensure intestinal protection and gut microbiota fortification Innovative Food Science & Emerging Technologies 80, 103103

According to circular economy, wine-making by-products represent a fascinating biomass, which can be used for the sustainable exploitation of polyphenols and the development of new nanotechnological health-promoting products. In this study, polyphenols contained in the grape pomace were extracted by maceration with ethanol in an easy and low dissipative way. The obtained extract, rich in malvidin-3-glucoside, quercetin, pro-cyanidin B2 and gallic acid, was incorporated into phospholipid vesicles tailored for intestinal delivery. To improve their performances, vesicles were enriched with gelatine or a maltodextrin (Nutriose (R)), or their com-bination (gelatine-liposomes, nutriosomes and gelatine-nutriosomes). The small (-147 nm) and negatively charged (--50mV) vesicles were stable at different pH values mimicking saliva (6.75), gastric (1.20) and intestinal (7.00) environments. Vesicles effectively protected intestinal cells (Caco-2) from the oxidative stress and promoted the biofilm formation by probiotic bacteria. A preliminary evaluation of the vesicle feasibility at industrial levels was also performed, analysing the economic and energetic costs needed for their production.

JTD Keywords: Adhesion, Antioxidant activity, Caco-2 cells, Dextrin, Grape pomace extract, Lactobacillus-reuteri, Manufacturing costs, Oxidative stress, Ph, Phospholipid vesicles, Polyphenols, Probiotic bacteria, Protein


Macedo, MH, Barros, AS, Martinez, E, Barrias, CC, Sarmento, B, (2022). All layers matter: Innovative three-dimensional epithelium-stroma-endothelium intestinal model for reliable permeability outcomes Journal Of Controlled Release 341, 414-430

Drug development is an ever-growing field, increasingly requesting reliable in vitro tools to speed up early screening phases, reducing the need for animal experiments. In oral delivery, understanding the absorption pattern of a new drug in the small intestine is paramount. Classical two-dimensional (2D) in vitro models are generally too simplistic and do not accurately represent native tissues. The main goal of this work was to develop an advanced three-dimensional (3D) in vitro intestinal model to test absorption in a more reliable manner, by better mimicking the native environment. The 3D model is composed of a collagen-based stromal layer with embedded fibroblasts mimicking the intestinal lamina propria and providing support for the epithelium, composed of enterocytes and mucus-secreting cells. An endothelial layer, surrogating the absorptive capillary network, is also present. The cellular crosstalk between the different cells present in the model is unveiled, disclosing key players, namely those involved in the contraction of collagen by fibroblasts. The developed 3D model presents lower levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and Multidrug Resistance Protein 2 (MRP2) efflux transporters, which are normally overexpressed in traditional Caco-2 models, and are paramount in the absorption of many compounds. This, allied with transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values closer to physiological ranges, leads to improved and more reliable permeability outcomes, which are observed when comparing our results with in vivo data.

JTD Keywords: 3d intestinal model, drug absorption, drug development, endothelium, hydrogel, 3d intestinal model, 3d modeling, 3d models, 3d-modeling, Alkaline-phosphatase, Animal experiments, Biopharmaceutics classification, Caco-2 cells, Cell culture, Collagen, Collagen gel, Drug absorption, Drug development, Endothelium, Fibroblasts, Glycoproteins, Hydrogel, In-vitro, Matrix metalloproteinases, Membrane-permeability, Paracellular transport, Permeability, Single-pass vs., Speed up