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Publications

by Keyword: Emissions

Venugopal, A, Ruiz-Perez, L, Swamynathan, K, Kulkarni, C, Calò, A, Kumar, M, (2023). Caught in Action: Visualizing Dynamic Nanostructures Within Supramolecular Systems Chemistry Angewandte Chemie 62, e202208681

Supramolecular systems chemistry has been an area of active research to develop nanomaterials with life-like functions. Progress in systems chemistry relies on our ability to probe the nanostructure formation in solution. Often visualizing the dynamics of nanostructures which transform over time is a formidable challenge. This necessitates a paradigm shift from dry sample imaging towards solution-based techniques. We review the application of state-of-the-art techniques for real-time, in situ visualization of dynamic self-assembly processes. We present how solution-based techniques namely optical super-resolution microscopy, solution-state atomic force microscopy, liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and other emerging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of active and adaptive nanomaterials with life-like functions. This Review provides the visualization toolbox and futuristic vision to tap the potential of dynamic nanomaterials.© 2022 Wiley-VCH GmbH.

JTD Keywords: electron-microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, in-situ, mechanical-properties, molecular simulations, nanostructures, polymerization, polymers, stimulated-emission, super-resolution microscopy, supramolecular chemistry, systems chemistry, water, Atomic-force microscopy, Liquid tem, Nanostructures, Super-resolution microscopy, Supramolecular chemistry, Systems chemistry


Arnau, M, Sans, J, Turon, P, Alemán, C, (2022). Decarbonization of Polluted Air by SolarDriven CO2 Conversion into Ethanol Using Polarized Animal Solid Waste as Catalyst Advanced Sustainable Systems 6, 2200283

Solorzano, A, Eichmann, J, Fernandez, L, Ziems, B, Jimenez-Soto, JM, Marco, S, Fonollosa, J, (2022). Early fire detection based on gas sensor arrays: Multivariate calibration and validation Sensors And Actuators B-Chemical 352, 130961

Smoldering fires are characterized by the production of early gas emissions that can include high levels of CO and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) due to pyrolysis or thermal degradation. Nowadays, standalone CO sensors, smoke detectors, or a combination of these, are standard components for fire alarm systems. While gas sensor arrays together with pattern recognition techniques are a valuable alternative for early fire detection, in practice they have certain drawbacks-they can detect early gas emissions, but can show low immunity to nuisances, and sensor time drift can render calibration models obsolete. In this work, we explore the performance of a gas sensor array for detecting smoldering and plastic fires while ensuring the rejection of a set of nuisances. We conducted variety of fire and nuisance experiments in a validated standard fire room (240 m(3)). Using PLS-DA and SVM, we evaluate the performance of different multivariate calibration models for this dataset. We show that calibration models remain predictive after several months, but perfect performance is not achieved. For example, 4 months after calibration, a PLS-DA model provides 100% specificity and 85% sensitivity since the system has difficulties in detecting plastic fires, whose signatures are close to nuisance scenarios. Nevertheless, our results show that systems based on gas sensor arrays are able to provide faster fire alarm response than conventional smoke-based fire alarms. We also propose the use of small-scale fire experiments to increase the number of calibration conditions at a reduced cost. Our results show that this is an effective way to increase the performance of the model, even when evaluated on a standard fire room. Finally, the acquired datasets are made publicly available to the community (doi: 10.5281/zenodo.5643074).

JTD Keywords: Calibration, Chemical sensors, Co2, Early fire, Early fire detection, En-54, Fire alarm, Fire detection, Fire room, Fires, Gas detectors, Gas emissions, Gas sensors, Pattern recognition, Public dataset, Sensor arrays, Sensors array, Signatures, Smoke, Smoke detector, Smoke detectors, Standard fire, Standard fire room, Support vector machines, Temperature, Toxicity, Volatile organic compounds


Burgués, J, Esclapez, MD, Doñate, S, Pastor, L, Marco, S, (2021). Aerial mapping of odorous gases in a wastewater treatment plant using a small drone Remote Sensing 13, 1757

Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are sources of greenhouse gases, hazardous air pollutants and offensive odors. These emissions can have negative repercussions in and around the plant, degrading the quality of life of surrounding neighborhoods, damaging the environment, and reducing employee’s overall job satisfaction. Current monitoring methodologies based on fixed gas detectors and sporadic olfactometric measurements (human panels) do not allow for an accurate spatial representation of such emissions. In this paper we use a small drone equipped with an array of electrochemical and metal oxide (MOX) sensors for mapping odorous gases in a mid-sized WWTP. An innovative sampling system based on two (10 m long) flexible tubes hanging from the drone allowed near-source sampling from a safe distance with negligible influence from the downwash of the drone’s propellers. The proposed platform is very convenient for monitoring hard-toreach emission sources, such as the plant’s deodorization chimney, which turned out to be responsible for the strongest odor emissions. The geo-localized measurements visualized in the form of a two-dimensional (2D) gas concentration map revealed the main emission hotspots where abatement solutions were needed. A principal component analysis (PCA) of the multivariate sensor signals suggests that the proposed system can also be used to trace which emission source is responsible for a certain measurement.

JTD Keywords: air pollution, environmental monitoring, gas sensors, industrial emissions, mapping, odour, uav, Air pollution, Drone, Environmental monitoring, Gas sensors, Industrial emissions, Mapping, Odour, Sensors, Uav


Pinheiro, ND, Freire, RT, Conrado, JAM, Batista, AD, Petruci, JFD, (2021). Paper-based optoelectronic nose for identification of indoor air pollution caused by 3D printing thermoplastic filaments Analytica Chimica Acta 1143, 1-8

Commercial printers based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) are widely adopted for 3D printing applications. This method consists of the heating of polymeric filaments over the melting point followed by their deposition onto a solid base to create the desirable 3D structure. Prior investigation using chromatographic techniques has shown that chemical compounds (e.g. VOCs), which can be harmful to users, are emitted during the printing process, producing adverse effects to human health and contributing to indoor air pollution. In this study, we present a simple, inexpensive and disposable paperbased optoelectronic nose (i.e. colorimetric sensor array) to identify the gaseous emission fingerprint of five different types of thermoplastic filaments (ABS, TPU, PETG, TRITAN and PLA) in the indoor environment. The optoelectronic nose is comprised of selected 15 dyes with different chemical properties deposited onto a microfluidic paper-based device with spots of 5 mm in diameter each. Digital images were obtained from an ordinary flatbed scanner, and the RGB information collected before and after air exposure was extracted by using an automated routine designed in MATLAB, in which the color changes provide a unique fingerprint for each filament in 5 min of printing. Reproducibility was obtained in the range of 2.5-10% (RSD). Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were successfully employed, showing suitable discrimination of all studied filaments and the non-polluted air. Besides, air spiked with vapors of the most representative VOCs were analyzed by the optoelectronic nose and visually compared to each filament. The described study shows the potential of the paper-based optoelectronic nose to monitor possible hazard emissions from 3D printers. (C) 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

JTD Keywords: 3d printing, colorimetric sensor array, indoor air pollution, optoelectronic nose, paper-based, 3d printing, Colorimetric sensor array, Emissions, Indoor air pollution, Optoelectronic nose, Paper-based, Thermoplastic filaments